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'll be talking foreign policy with national security adviser dr. brzezinski. keep it right here on "morning joe." music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to
spoke thursday about the future of u.s. foreign policy. the syrian civil war, and other challenges facing the middle east. this came at a forum hosted by "foreign-policy" magazine. she also answer questions. this is an hour. [applause] >> madam secretary, today we solve all your problems. nothing left to worry about, really. actually, the office of policy planning and the foreign policy group made a bet we could bring together leaders from inside government from leaders outside government to have a real discussion about the future of american foreign policy. is there to say based on the conversation we had today that that has paid off. that is especially thanks to say paanalysts and participants to mid really impressive than insightful interventions over the course of the day. i also want to give a special thank you to people at the foreign-policy group and policy planning office, who were the heart and soul of putting today together. if you've given a quick round of applause. -- you could give them a quick round of applause. [applause] we made a second bet that david could shine a
the nature of the obama administration foreign policy is, paul. and susan rice in some ways encapsulates a strain in democratic policy thinking that goes way back, a story that's actually told by samantha power, a close aide to president obama and wrote about genocide in with a randa. and susan rice is state department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and not the president's mid ter
, for instance, one of president obama's closest advisers. she was his principal foreign policy adviser during his first campaign and helped shape his world view. they have a similar world view. all of this signifies susan rice would be influential when she goes to speak to diplomats around the world and world leaders and also in formulating foreign policy, which is very good for the state department. on the downside, you see what's happening with the benghazi affair. she's likely to have a bruising confirmation process. some republican senators said they might hold up her nomination. that could drag out a while. john kerry, on the other hand, would be easily confirmable. you see the senators are encouraging president obama to nominate him. senator kerry also has a lot of world stature, has relationships with many world leaders. he's seen as someone who could help build on those relationships to further foreign policy and also senator kerry also, as chairman of the foreign relations committee, very popular chairman, has a lot of diplomatic experience. president obama has used him you know out
of state, they don't get into domestic politics. but when there's an extra nation on foreign policy to the american people, they do go on news shows. i used to go on news shows. susan rice has been on other news shows besides those five. they are the chief foreign policy spokesman for theed a handwriting. to suggest not to go on news shows because that's political is just not part of precedent and it's wrong. i think senator collins is -- i know her. i think she's trying to do the best job she can. but to say not to go on those news shows, that doesn't really jive. >> let me ask you one other thing, governor, about senator collins. she wants susan rice to explain her role in the bombings in africa, tanzania and kenya in 1998. you were the ambassador in 1998. did susan rice have any oversight or any authority at all that dealt with those embassies in kenya and tanzania that she would have to explain? >> no. she is not a homeland security officer. at the time, she was assistant secretary of africa on policy. she was making policy towards sudan, towards kenya, towards south africa. an
, vice president of foreign policy at brookings, coconvenienter of the forum on u.s./israel relations convening this week. thanks very much. what is the significance of what happened at the u.n.? a step forward, a step back or status quo? >> i guess a step sideways, out of the normal channel for resolving the conflict peacefully, that is through negotiati negotiations, sideways to the united nations. it doesn't move the palestinians forward. it's a significant but symbolic act. and if it produces a kind of punitive, vicious circle in which the israelis now announce more settlement activity, the particularly strategic activity it seems to be, and then the palestinians decide to go to the international criminal court who would charge israel with some crimes and then we'll get into a downward spiral, the congress cuts the funds to the palestinian authority, we could be in very negative territory quite quickly and bear in mind that there's an election coming up in israel in which an outbidding process is likely to occur. already you have lieberman calling for the toppling of abu mazen and
. >> ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel and our great country, and it's almost a mystical relationship when you think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it's due to the fact that this is not just jewish support, we're only 2% of the population in the united states. it's because we have shared values, shared enemies, and islamic terrorism. that many people in the united states view israel as the holy land not just jews but non-jews as well. there's a remarkable time when there is so much polarization between the republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> what -- the future of the jews, is your book title provocative in any way? do you mean to be? >> i mean it to be. the question is can of peopl
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we shou
of the old foreign policy guard, versus this new foreign policy guard and some led by jon kyl who is not an isolationist, if you will. there is some isolationist views there but it's an interesting divide sitting in the senate. >> it's not even a divide anymore. some aren't part of the caucus anymore. with this issue, part of it is to say that there's skepticism, overall skepticism of the u.n. among some of the republican party, which is probably an understatement. this digs deeper into that deep rooted skepticism of the body in general. >> all right. i want to move to fiscal cliff here. there's a mix of public opinion and public policy here. democrats feel as if they're winning the public opinion war but that isn't going to get them 218 votes. so at what point does winning the public opinion sort of become diminishing returns? >> well, i don't think it comes to diminishing returns. you see consistently that the exit polls show that people -- not just support president obama but support seeing the wealthy pay a little bit more on taxes, half of the electorate said that. everybody
. they're not focusing on anything legitimate regarding the actual foreign policy. they took what happened in libya and turned into a tragedy in search of a scandal, when it is just simply a tragedy. >> ari, another name that came up
basis on which to determine british policy on this though? when the foreign secretary understands statehood is not a gift to be given, but a right to be acknowledged. i won the foreign secretary of the united kingdom abstains tomorrow, it will not be a measure of our growing influence. it would be a confirmation of our growing irrelevance to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe i believe will be the search for peace across europe i believe will be an overwhelming majority of 102 members of the general assembly voting for enhanced observer status for palestinians. that can and must send a signal to the palestinians that diplomatic effort in the path of politics or not the path of pockets of violence to his two state solution. let's be honest, in recent days, hamas in the midst of the conflict with israel welcome the secretary general, prime minister v-chip comforter set turkey, iraq, jordan come the pulse to any authority, saudi arabia
will understand that we cannot discern in our foreign policy our prior opinions. there are a number of issues on which we do not agree, on a conclusion that would be reached. >> mr. speaker, given the distinct history of our country and the legacy left behind in the region, does the foreign secretary agree that we have a unique ability to show leadership and courage for the palestinians and israelis who want peace. and surely, this can be one way to signal that leadership. i ask them to think again. >> we have a unique responsibility and we do not have the same power as in the 1940s, although we do have it in a new and different form. we have a great responsibility as a member of the u.n. u.n. security council. but the problem is giving hope to palestinians and israelis, that is a very important point that she made. it is important that we do that and give hope to people on both sides of that divide. and that is what i am seeking to do today. >> recognizing this position to an extent, but i'm sorry to say i think there are a lot of fundamentals -- [inaudible] given that countries around the w
's a problem with the photo op foreign policy with few real accomplishments and it's becoming more apparent to people around the world. >> gregg: we also supply aid to the palestinians, humanitarian aid. should that be reconsidered most recent actions against israel? >> with any aid you have to ask what it is doing, what goal is it advancing? we keep harping on both parties but seemingly hard the other israelis that we need to come to some sort of negotiation, get to the table have an agreement, petition agreement. i think we need to step back and realize the political factors in place for an agreement. if you have gaza run by hamas, starting wars with israel whenever you turn your back it's not going to lead to an agreement. we should be focusing on money and state on changing those political factors rather than writing these checks left and right. >> gregg: how do we can changes those political factors and what is the possibility in the near or distant future there could be a reconciliation and on the other hand gaza the palestinians there controlled by what is essentially a terrorist gro
there are genuine foreign policy issues and contentions needing to be resolved. is he trying to rush this through too quickly? what do we know about what the document itself will look like, and whether or not it will be one that captures the democratic principles that we hope that egypt moves forward with. >> there are loads of questions and you put your finger on many of them. let's be hopeful to suggest that this may be a marchbury versus madison moment in egypt. you have constitutions playing their role. president morsi has been fighting hard to make sure there is an effective executive. you have a judiciary who wants to display its independence. unfortunately you don't have a parliament dissolved by egypt's equivalent of the supreme court. i think there are very serious questions about this constitutional assembly, not so much formation but 25% of it reflects the religious minorities and women have walked out because they don't think their issues are being adequately addressed. i think first and for most, what kind of document emerges. how tolerant is that document, how much support there is
to play what was essentially a political role. lou: israel, gaza, egypt, and ron, american foreign policy. will we ever get the facts on what happened in benghazi? we are joined next. ♪ lou: the white house today said president obama is not particularly concerned whether susan rice misled americans on the attack. press secretary fired back when asked whether the president recognizes the way information about benghazi has been handled and whether that raises serious questions. >> not particularly concerned about whether the ambassador or i went out and talk about the fact we believe extremists might have been irresponsible and whether we named them as terrorists or not does not -- no, it does not have any bearing on what happened and who is reeponsible as that investigation was continuing in benghazi. lou: you have to give this white house credit, i must say. i won't go into but we have to give them credit for, but ambassador susan rice failing to ease criticism again following meetings with senator susan collins and bob corker. joining us now, pulitzer prize-winning journalist, fox is c
was essentially a political role. lou: israel, gaza, egypt, and ron, american foreign policy. will we ever get the facts on what happened in benghazi? we are joined next. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the w to do it! now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand t value of quality time and personal attention. which is why we are proud to partner with health care pressionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! ohh! [ giggles ] [ male aouncer ] humana thanks the physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharmacists and other health professionals who helped uschieve the highest average star rating among national medicare companies... and become the first and only national medicare advantage company to achieve a 5-star rating for a medicare plan... your efforts result in the quality of care and service we're able to provide... which means better health outcomes... and more quaty time to share with the ones who matter most. i love you, grandma! [ male announcer ] humana. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male
, the person he thinks will best help him shape and project this country's foreign policy. just as important, the senate has the duty to advise and consent to his decision. if senators see a serious problem with a nominee, they have a right and duty to speak and vote that way. someone keeps telling the press that president obama prefers to nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice, and as long as that person is not the president and does so under ground rules that protect his or her identity, we are condemned to this preventative war we're watching in washington. one side attacking while no one outside the gates of the white house knows what the president intends. i take president obama at his official word. he has not decided whose name to send to the senate, and with that we go to the first of our two senatorial guests, senator bob corker, republican of tennessee. senator corker, i have laid it out as best i can. you senators have a right and a duty to decide, to advise and consent or not to a president's nominee. isn't this strange that we're having the debate about the qualifications for a can
wants to return with a solid government. >> eliot: as we all learned foreign policy has domestic roots all over the place. we forget that sometimes. let's switch over to egypt, president morsi who came off the heels of international kudos and then came into bear tracks with his assembly and protest. is the content of this constitutional draft to the extent we've been able to pars it one that we in the united states look at favorably. does it balance civil liberties and the necessary role of islam in the new democracy in egypt? >> well, you know there is no way to call this a great constitution. it's a patchwork, and sort of a cobbling together various pieces of the old constitution with a few new ideas. if you want to be nervous there is plenty in there to be nervous. but i'm remaining hopeful for egypt. i'm impressed and it could be revised at any point. i'm impressed with how they've handled their revolution over the last year and a half. it could be so much worse. there could have been a muslim brotherhood who could have broken the peace treaty with israel or those who decided to go
that on foreign policy. >> look, i think what we've learned is that he is a chicago machine politician who happens to have radical values. he is seeking to run the united states the same way the chicago machine would run chicago. i think the challenge for house republicans is, to design a strategy from the base of strength they have, and to be able to say we are not going to go along with this president taking over the whole country in a centralized model where he will have no accountability. they can borrow endless money the geithner proposal, no accountability to anybody. >> sean: mr. speaker appreciate it. great new book. next, bob woodward takes us inside the fiscal cliff negotiating room. he wrote about the grand bargain that didn't happen. congressman louie gohmert is here. you will be surprised what he has to say. it is the story that is now swept the nation a police officer buying a barefoot homeless man a pair of shoes. the woman who captured that video will tell us what the camera didn't. she will join us tonight on hannity. r streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for yo
and advisors are headed for the exits. who are the replacement and what impact on the foreign policy. doug has more for us in washington. >> foremost is who will replace hillary clinton as secretary of state? the white house signaled that un ambassador susan rice will be the choice . this week, the president voiced ut most confidence in her. >> susan rice is extraordinary . couldn't be prouder of a job done. >> also this week another republican senator expressed major doubts about rice not only about the bengazi terrorist attack but because of the africa section during the terrorist attack in the embassy in kenya when they pled for better security. susan collins teled the message to the administration about the secretary of state opening. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and easily confirmed by the colleagues. >> there are other key cabinet picks. secretary of the defense will have to contend with a destabilized middle east and rising threats from asia when big defense cuts are anticipated. former republican chuck ha gel of nebraska and ashton carter and michelle florino
spent a dollar they couldn't spend twice. obama could be a great foreign policy president if he pretended the enemies are rich americans. >> bob: you don't think there is waste in defense? >> greg: absolutely. i do think there is a waste of defense. >> dana: the waste in defense, climate change programs that they have to do. >> eric: greg pointed out things that are important. listen to the genius, howard dean. >> the only problem, truth is everybody needs to pay more taxes, not just the rich. >> that is not harasssy, that is honesty. honest moment for the first time. >> bob: can you tell us 30 seconds to tell us how to get the deficit down? >> greg: stop spending. >> bob: i get that. >> eric: i don't need 30 seconds. go over the fiscal cliff. take $1.2 trillion out of spending and tax hikes, stops the spending. mandatory spending cuts across the board. you know what? the only way to do it. only way to do it. everything else is chump change. >> dana: how do you deal with deficit reduction if you raise the taxes on a portion of the country that will pay for the government for 8.
concern is the influence tha state of israel and the foreigns on america's policy is just out of proportion. paul craig roberts is an economist and former assistant secretary of the treasury. he has been writing about this a lot recently. i think we need to take a look at the state of israel's influence on our foreign policy. i would like to see clinton and bush, all of them, go home and all of these politicians who keep coming back and not serving the american people. host: we are going to move on and talk about the fiscal cliff and some of the issues surrounding that. we are going to look at a specific issue of so-called tax extenders a little bit later with sam goldfarb. he will also be talking about tax issues in general when it comes to the fiscal cliff. if you have questions about tax issues or comments about how taxes should be included in these discussions, he will be taking your calls. up next, we're going to have a look at republicans and the fiscal cliff negotiations with radio talk-show host and columnist armstong williams. that is coming up next as we continue the
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
'll read an excerpt from foreign policy. with the exception of syria she's won every major battle she's fought at u.n., imposes sanctions on north korea, sending a peacekeeping force, and warding off a full-scale war of sudan and south sudan. you're talking about qualifications for secretary of state, that qualifies her more than reading talking points. >> and at the beginning of this she was one of the few administration officials along with hillary clinton who pushed reluctant people inside the white house, including tom donnell lynn to interview in libya, a position senator republicans took at the time. >> human rights is a key issue and done a lot at u.n. with regard to women, disabled people. and i worked with her in the clinton administration. she was, you know, very tenacious. very intelligent woman. very strong willed. i guess one of the things, as a woman i don't like, some of the criticism of her, if this was a man, it -- these would be positive attributes. >> exactly. >> as a woman, well you know she's feisty. >> or they -- when mccain said she's not very brought, this is s
the spokesman for the democratic administration's position on foreign policy. and you know, colin powell, god bless him and says this will be the shame of his life, he was the one without made the case for going to war in iraq, you know, as the spokesman. i think this. what struck me was the administration has really handled this badly. i mean you don't send her up to the hill to meet with people unless you're going have some friendly meetings too. are you going to have some positive people come out and say claire mccaskill, they say how wonderful she is and at the same time what you have got to have is other people. where are the endorsers. i haven't heard from madeleine albright, hillary clinton. she just kind of out there by herself which may be a message. >> i will keep watching that one and everything else. >> mark shield, david brooks, thanks as always. and if you want even more, mark and david keep up the talk on the "doubleheader" recorded in our newsroom. that will be posted at the top of the "rundown" later tonight. >> warner: we'll be back shortly with a look at efforts to pinpoint
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
in egypt, this is all part of a much larger failure of the obama administration's foreign policy. you had ambassador rice, secretary clinton, president obama day after day after day issuing warnings to assad. you can see the good it's done. he continues to slaughter his own people. >> sean: some sources are saying we may be sending our carriers and we may be, in fact, making some military moves. i don't know if it's going to be too late. we'll have to watch and monitor and pray those weapons don't get used. >> sean: let me ask you. this whole campaign, there was a war on women and the majority of the discussion democrat with free contraception for women, 9 bucks a month for birth control pills. now we've got more morsi mobs, muslim brother hood mobs raping women in public. i haven't heard a peep out of the president. he asked mubarak to go. he's not asking morsi to go. the military has been taken over. the new constitution calls for shuria. where is the president and the feminist movement? >> we have all been focused on the fiscal cliff as we should be, but we're looking at a national sec
first term, obviously, went with secretary gates despite his ties to republican foreign policy. hagel is more of a progressive voice, but i'm not sure that a second-term obama presidency reaches back to another republican defense figure. >> and as to the john kerry/susan rice dilemma that the president faces, he says that the attacks on susan rice won't affect his decision one way or another. it won't force his hand to nominate her, and it won't affect his decision to go with senator kerry, if that's what he chooses to do. is he going to be able to incredibly present his choice as his real first choice under these circumstances? >> well, that's the problem with this town, right? when you have these kind of vicious attacks you are damned if you do and damned if you don't. for cynical operators which i think there are some in the attacks on rice among the republican caucus here, they get a sort of partial short-term victory there because there is a lot of noise. i think at the end of the day this president gets his first choice, secretary of state nominee through regardless of which one
, a centrist on foreign policy has expressed support for some of the obama administrations recent national security policy. again, that's from the hill reporting on foreign policy magazine's article yesterday. now, this is from the washington times this morning. hill panels play musical chairs, this is about the new chairs of the house committees in the house of representatives, and from yesterday's newspaper, the hill, gmple o.p. women press boehner for top committee spots. this is molly hooper's article. molly hooper reports on the leadership in congress for the hill newspaper. molly, who are some of the new chairs? caller: well, the new chairs happen to mostly be men. in fact, they're all men, with the exception of two open spots that have yet to be assigned by speaker boehner. but we're basically going to see a lot of the old faces. there's seven committees have new chairman this year, or will in the next congress. you'll be seeing a conservative republican from texas, atop financial services. ed royce, california republican of foreign affairs. representative mike mccall, texas republi
the fight with john tower in the first term. not a great way to start it. foreign policy is usually the time presidents get tripped up. it happened with truman and rgan and bush in iraq. foreign policy surprises can derail a second term. the president will have to be careful of benghazi. >> gretchen: you would think if they were concerned about legacy they would do things they know they can control. nick, thank you for your thoughts. >> thank you. >> gretchen: she should have died, the cheerleader who fell 40 feet from a window . he used the gun to save his boss. how was he rewarded? he was fired. happy birthday to johnnie resneck of the goo-goo dolls. he's 47. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> now that the election is over i am getting the impression that president obama is getting a little cocky. >> working to get public support for the tax and spending proposal. president obama answered questions on twitter. how will you stop us from going over the fiscal cliff and will it involve significant deficit reduction. the president said i thought twitter was supposed to be fun. where are all of the crazy video. tw
for international peace. we believe that our global economic interests and our foreign policy values are closely tied together. they should be closely tied together. and that's why we urge our colleagues to seize this opportunity that russia's succession to the world trade organization presents for both job creation and our ability to bind russia to a rule-based system of trade and dispute resolution. granting russia permanent normal trade relations is as much in our interest as it is in theirs. frankly, that's what ought to guide the choices that we make in the senate. the up side of this policy is clear on an international landscape. it is one that really offers this kind of what i would call, frankly, a kind of one-sided trade deal, one that promises billions of dollars in new u.s. exports and thousands of new jobs in america that is certainly in our interest. russia is today the world's seventh-largest economy. having officially joined the w.t.o. on august 22, russia is now required by its membership in the w.t.o. to lower tariffs and to open up to new imports. that sudden jump in market acc
.s. troops on the ground. they wanted minimal arms to defend themselves and we outsourced our foreign policy to fundamentalist regimes and they supported the fundamentalists. there is one other issue. the nato air defense patriot batteries going to turkey to defend turkish air space and send a message to assad. that an inside baseball nato issue. and i wouldn't confuse that with giving arms to the syrian rebels. megyn: is there any way of establishing a safe haven any want the viewers to know syria seems so far away it seems like there is a bad guy running it and folks trying to exploit the situation. but the reports are some of these assad forces were going door to door, lining up entire families, shooting little kids in the head in front of their parent and shooting the parent in front of the children. lining them up one by one and watching them kill the families right in front of them. it's so gruesome and vial. is there anything we can do in terms of establishing a safe haven or something for people to get to? >> certainly there are de facto safe havens across the turkish and jordanian f
that so unsecured when the british left and everyone else. if we don't change our strategy from a foreign policy, change this lightfoot print approach to the war on terror there will be more benghazis. martha: what about that morning. i'm joined by kt macfarland. kt, it's so interesting. you watch these shows and you hear benghazi brought up. so often the reacross is get over it. move on. move on. why should we not move on? >> because that wham we did in 1998 when there were twin bombings in u.s. embassies in east africa and in 2000 when there was an attack against the u.s.s. cole in the region. what are we doing now? fast forward a decade. we have had attacks on american soil at consulate and americans had died. what are we doing? we are arguing with ourselves. we know where those died training camps are in eastern libya. why not go after them. what is the lesson al qaeda takes from this? once again no consequences. the americans will be fighting each other, not us. i think we allow them to become emboldened, and this is a green light for continuing to attack americans. martha: what do y
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
cuba has been essentially stagnant. the core element of our policy, our foreign policy, which is the embargo, has authorized in a proclamation signed by president kennedy on february 3, 1962. that's 51 years ago. at that time, president kennedy justified the embargo by citing the -- quote -- "subversive, offensive of sino-soviet communism with which the government of cuba is publicly aligned." end quote. he also stated his willingness to -- quote -- "take all action necessary to promote national and hemispheric security by isolating the present government of cuba and thereby reducing the threat posed by its alignment with these communist powers." it's an understatement to say that president kennedy's rationale is from a different era. the cold war is over. the, quote -- "subversive offensive of sino-soviet communism has been turned back, and what remains of the communist powers that he was referring to are now our major trading partners. we have now extended permanent normal trade relations to russia. this was, of course, the principal communist power to which president kenn
what we're about to get to on foreign policy issues which will serve as a backdrop for the remainder of the term. you've got to get this done to get over that hump. you've got to think the president's focused on it which is why i remain optimistic that it may get done december 20th. >> on the sunday talk shows that you're talking about, let's just strip it down. a man in negotiations does not say to another man, you're going to cave. do you say that to another man in negotiations? and you think you're going to get him to cave? >> no, sloulgabsolutely not. >> oh, please, this is all about men. come on. first of all, a woman would never think saying that because they would lactually be much moe reasonable, and something would actually get done. but if you're going to negotiate as men, you're going to have to find a way to strategically make the other side feel whole while not destroying your own ego at the same time. i didn't understand when i watched the treasury secretary saying oh, yeah, they'll cave. that doesn't work between them. it doesn't. >> mika, listening to you speak -- >>
the lugar energy initiative, he has combined his foreign policy and agricultural expertise to promote policies to spur economic growth. mr. president, in the dark days following the attacks of september 11, 2001, senator lugar set forth a set of principles to guide our nation in these difficult times. the lugar doctrine calls upon the united states to use all of its military, diplomatic, and economic power without question to ensure that life-threatening weapons of mass destruction everywhere are accounted, contained, and hopefully destroyed. end quote. in addition, the lugar doctrine asserts that america should encourage democratic institutions and decrease reliance on foreign energy sources. these accomplishments and so many more stem from a profound intellect combined with characteristic. there's nothing i love more than to hear dick lugar give a tutorial on any country in the world, and he can do so; he can talk knowledgeably and teach us about any country in the world. that is the depth of his experience, his knowledge, his expertise. dick has also always been a voice of reason i
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